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Why the Suns shouldn’t consider trading Kevin Durant

Why the Suns shouldn’t consider trading Kevin Durant

The Phoenix Suns have a decision to make regarding the future status of head coach Frank Vogel, the 22nd pick in this year’s draft, and perhaps even the status of superstar Kevin Durant.

The question of whether Durant’s trade would be beneficial to the future of the franchise has been raised by both the national media and Suns fans.

The idea behind the move is the perception that Durant would be the easiest to leave for next season — even if he wouldn’t give in as much as Devin Booker.

While it’s certainly intriguing to talk about finding ways to reset the roster just 15 months after Durant was acquired from the Brooklyn Nets, it would be a bad move — no matter which angle the proposal is approached from.

Durant is among the top 15 talents to ever play in the NBA – and almost certainly the most talented individual to ever play for Phoenix.

It would be malpractice to move on from Durant for that reason, plus the sheer volume of what Phoenix gave up to start him.

Suns owner Mat Ishbia has invested way too much money to give up a player of Durant’s stature after just one full season – it just doesn’t make sense, even with substantial trade offers.

The icing on the cake is the fact that a team like the Oklahoma City Thunder would logically keep young stars like Chet Holmgren and Jalen Williams off the table – and there’s no chance a player like Josh Giddey sufficient in a hypothetical commercial package.

Durant is too great to give up, Ishbia has too much invested in the heart of Phoenix and potential trade destinations would carry more weight in potential conversations.

“No one has done it yet. I believe we will be the first team to do it because if we can maximize him, we can maximize our entire roster,” Suns general manager James Jones said of Durant.

“We’re a better team, but that’s not a problem. I think Kevin had a phenomenal season this year offensively.”

Trading Durant – even considering the possibility – is unequivocally a bad decision at this point.