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Tony Schiavone discusses unfair treatment of Lex Luger in AEW

Tony Schiavone discusses unfair treatment of Lex Luger in AEW

Tony Schiavone, the voice of WCW broadcasts during the great 1990s, recently shared his insights into Lex Luger’s wrestling career, shedding light on the complexity of Luger’s relationship with the wrestling world.

Schiavone himself saw Luger in his prime reach enormous heights, such as his unforgettable WCW World Heavyweight Championship victory over Hulk Hogan in 1997, and further afield he saw him fight hard to regain a bad reputation among fans and peers.

On a recent episode of the wrestling podcast “What Happened When?,” fan favorite Schiavone responded to a listener’s request about sharing some of his Luger stories. Luger was often at odds with wrestlers and the wrestling community because people thought he was aloof.

According to Schiavone, it was all just a misplaced sentiment. “Lex had a little warmth because he was distant,” Schiavone explained. “But I always thought it wasn’t fair to him. I thought Lex was a good guy.”

The misunderstood character of Luger

Throughout his career, Luger was often described as aloof, a trait that alienated some of his colleagues.

However, Schiavone also mentions that Luger’s stash was poorly placed and hidden deep. “We always had great conversations, and I really liked and understood him,” Schiavone said, highlighting another side of Luger that wasn’t always visible to the general public.

Arn Anderson, former teammate of the Four Horsemen with Luger, who humorously nicknamed him “Eggplant”, is an eye-opening story of the inner workings of WCW. This makes the nickname light and easy, but it also shows, in some ways, the complex relationships that Luger would have within the wrestling fraternity.

These thoughts from Schiavone on Luger’s career add, perhaps more than anything else, that the controversies and setbacks of the latter part of his career deserve at least a nuanced interpretation. Then, listeners receive a more fleshed-out account of Luger as a person much more than his public persona, someone who inspires respect and sympathy from the candid memories of fans and wrestling contemporaries like those provided by Schiavone.