close
close

Boeing plane skids off runway in Senegal, injuring 10 people

A Boeing building

A Boeing building
Photo: Mario Tama (Getty Images)

A bad thing happened to another Boeing plane on Thursday. A 737-300 operated by Senegalese airline Transair skidded off the runway while on fire at Blaise Diagne International Airport in Dakar, Senegal. A press release from the Ministry of Infrastructure, Land and Air Transport of Senegal posted on social media platform According to Gambian media Kerr Fatou, 10 people were injured, including the pilot, and taken to hospital.

THE Associated Press reports that Malian musician Cheick Siriman Sissoko wrote on Facebook that “our plane just caught fire”. Reuters reports that videos posted on social networks indicate that the left was in flames.

The injuries appear to be linked to the sudden deceleration of the plane and not to a fire. The cause of the fire was not immediately apparent, although Senegal’s Bureau of Investigation and Analysis has opened an investigation.

Surely Boeing doesn’t need another PR headache in the wake of the consequences Since a door stopper falls a 737 Max 9 operated by Alaska Airlines in full flight in January, but alas. The plane involved in the January incident is a different plane than the 737-300, which is an older model.

The Ministry of Justice has opened a criminal investigation on board the Alaska Airlines flight and informed passengers that they may have been the victim of a crime. CEO Dave Calhoun announced that he would resign from one’s position at the end of the year. Although Calhoun intends to remain a member of the company’s board of directors, proxy advisor Glass Lewis said that this is not a good idea.

“We believe it is reasonable to assume that the board will understand the involvement of shareholders voting against the outgoing CEO and key directors of the company in monitoring the company’s culture and security risks; that is, shareholders will send a clear indication of their dissatisfaction with the company’s recent oversight and management of safety issues and safety culture,” the organization said in a report.