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Flight delays and cancellations: new reimbursement rules

Many of you have questions about the Department of Transportation’s new rules regarding compensation for flight delays and cancellations, which will come into effect in October. Recently, a viewer emailed Rossen Reports asking if he could get a refund for a canceled flight a few years from now. ago.We contacted the nonprofit group FlyersRights, who told us that in their experience Delta and Southwest generally give you a year to request a refund, but that’s not immediately clear with the other airlines. However, you are only entitled to a refund. if you do not accept alternative transportation. So if your flight was canceled, the airline rebooked you for the next day, and if you do that, you don’t get a refund. These new DOT rules clearly establish what constitutes a significant delay. For a domestic flight, it’s three hours. For an international flight, it’s six hours. The new rules also require airlines to tell you whether you’re entitled to a refund – instead of having to jump through hoops. To learn more about your rights when traveling by plane, visit the Office of Aviation Consumer Protection website at transport.gov/. air consumer. Do you have a question for Jeff Rossen? He answers your consumer questions every Friday in the new “Rossen Responds” segment. Send your questions to [email protected].

Many of you have questions about the Ministry of Transport’s new rules regarding compensation for flight delays and cancellations, which will come into effect in October.

Recently, a viewer emailed Rossen Reports asking if he could get a refund for a flight that was canceled a few years ago.

We contacted the nonprofit group FlyersRights, who told us that in their experience Delta and Southwest generally give you a year to request a refund, but that’s not immediately clear with other airlines.

However, you are only entitled to a refund if you do not agree to alternative transportation. So if your flight was canceled, the airline rebooked you for the next day, and if you do that, you don’t get a refund.

These new DOT rules clearly establish what constitutes a significant delay. For a domestic flight, it’s three hours. For an international flight, it’s six hours. The new rules also require airlines to tell you whether you’re eligible for a refund – instead of having to jump through hoops.

To learn more about your rights when traveling by air, visit the Office of Aviation Consumer Protection website at transport.gov/airconsumer.

Do you have a question for Jeff Rossen? He answers your consumer questions every Friday in the new “Rossen Responds” segment. Send your questions to him at [email protected].