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LISTEN: Monotaurs mix Nick Cave-inspired dark flows with jazz nods on “Rain”

Meet The Monotaurs, an experimental project that blends postpunk and art-rock influences to create a unique sound that is both philosophical and intentional. Led by Klaipėda-based producer Jurgis Survila and visual artist Ilya Romanov, the band releases songs that consciously evade classification. While drawing inspiration from Krautrock and post-punk, the band always allows the songs to develop where the music flows, introducing psychedelic, jazzy or symphonic elements into its storytelling. This eclectic canvas serves as a backdrop for Marmite-style vocals, often opting for the Sprechgesang style inspired by Serge Gainsbourg, Nick Cave, Jarvis Cocker or Ian Brown. Artistic designs are considered an integral part of each release, providing unexpected dimensions to the listener’s imagination.

There’s a strange feeling that casts a shadow over your surroundings when you press “Rain.” The Monotaurs create an unavoidable but warm and welcoming sonic tension. What begins as a gloomy gray sky quickly evolves into a picturesque glimpse of the sun as bright synths join dark drums and thick guitar chords. “Rain” builds on itself to build to a stunning crescendo that implements elements of spiritual jazz with the band’s offbeat approach to melodies. “Rain” is a great example of how Minotaurs employ a multitude of influences and channel them through their own lens to result in something refreshing and exciting.

“’Rain’ is our second English song to be released. The climate in Lithuania is not the sunniest (‘rainland’ is actually one of the versions of this land’s name), so that’s an obvious inspiration behind the lyrics,” explains Survlia. “We tried to assemble an appropriate musical landscape to convey that vibe while still retaining an element of improvisation to keep it evolving. Although depressing and dark, after a certain breaking point this powerful element proves vital, so we pray for rain, we dance in the rain – all these cultural connotations with a rich history come to the surface…”